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The vision of
our mission

We are in love with what we do, and we do ‘culturez. Our aim is to turn Drinking Culture in a fine art, a uniquecelebration of tastes and socialisation founded in the values of the great 1920’s.

We found our vision on “the roaring twenties”, a time of explosive financial and cultural growth; a time of great confidence powered by mass production and increased consumer spending.

Almost as a backlash to the atrocities of the Great War the 1920’s crashed in with a new spirit of optimism and hope with cities such as New York, Paris, Berlin and London shining out as beacons of creativity and expressionism across music, dance, art and fashion.

In stark contrast to the decorative and highly floral Victorian era, the 20’s saw an altogether more eclectic blend of rich colours, bold geometric shapes and lavish ornamentation known as Art Deco. A new age had truly begun and along with it a real desire to “celebrate the good times”.

A brilliant realisation of this was expressed in what has become defining commentary of that time as written by F. Scott Fitzgerald. The Great Gatsby, set in on the prosperous Long Island, New York beautifully captures the mood of that time, the evolution of jazzmusic, the flapper culture and the general sense of progression.

Reclining Nude

All this good stuff belies the fact that there was a slight anomaly in this story of decadence and happiness - and that anomaly was prohibition. Prohibition was the national ban on the sale, production and transportation of alcohol in the USA cutting right through the roaring twenties ending in 1933.

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So where did all the bar tenders
go?

Circumstances dictated that many bar tenders sought employment elsewhere but a few decided to ply their trade “over the pond” arriving on these shores (and Europe) to continue their traditions of serving drinks with style, grace and a true sense of occasion.

Our heroine, Kate Meyrick

We would like to think that some of these free and easy spirits would have collided with the heroine of our story, one Kate Meyrick, a mild mannered doctors wife from Dublin who, in capturing the mood of the time became the infamous proprietor of The 43 Club in Gerrard Street, London. Dear Kate played host to an exceedingly polarised group of people; millionaires, sports men, show girls, exiled kings and even murderers all of whom enjoyed her clubs unique brand of dancing, gaiety and “the best of good times”.

Kate Meyrick

All this good stuff belies the fact that there was a slight anomaly in this story of decadence and happiness - and that anomaly was prohibition. Prohibition was the national ban on the sale, production and transportation of alcohol in the USA cutting right through the roaring twenties ending in 1933.

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So dedicated to the cause of “the good time” she did much to ensure her clients weren’t left wanting and on several occasions (5 to be precise) went to prison for “unseemly behaviour” culminating in a 15 month spell in Holloway prison for bribing police officer George Goddard.

What a girl.

The 43 Club today

"Can't repeat the past?... Why of course you can!"- F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, Ch. 6

So it is with respect for that unique time in history that we present to you “the return of The 43”, a contemporary re-imagining of a classic and happy time where the cares of the day vanish and are replaced with a perfect cocktail and drinks experience.

Having lovingly immersed ourselves in that time we now present an experience that evokes the spirit, dedication and sheer audacity of that period with bar tenders who fully understand the concept behind “the good time”.

Happy days are indeed here again.